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Comeback Time for Pooja Bhatt!

After fifteen years, Pooja Bhatt is gearing up to face the camera once again in father Mahesh Bahtt’s written script. The actress-filmmaker is nervous and excited at the same time to play an alcoholic woman in the yet-to-be titled flick. The script is under process and is expected to go on floors this year itself.
 

The 43-year-old actress says that it was her father who convinced her for making a comeback into acting. “He looked at me with manic eyes and told me, 'I've got a story for you.' It's a gift from a father to his daughter and will celebrate my insanity”, Pooja laughed off saying.
 

“I am at that phase in my life when I want to let go now. So though I am terrified about going back and facing the camera because you can't take the medium for granted, for a story like this I'm prepared to get destroyed all over again. It's Daddy (her debut film) again, life's brought this opportunity, I'll open my arms wide and embrace it. Bring it on!”, said Pooja Bhatt. 

In this film, her character is a talented, swinging actress who is slowly losing her mojo. She's in depression, gets drunk and into brawls, before passing out. Eventually, she realises that she is running away from the guilt of letting go of her little daughter. At that point in her life, fame and stardom was more important than playing mommy to a love child born of a disastrous relationship. So she lets the child be brought up by another and now suffers terrible remorse. 

"In most societies, and particularly ours, a man who has abandoned his child is given a second chance. But if it's the mother who has disowned the baby, she is seen as aberration, a bi*** and evil. We want to change that script," points out Pooja. 

She recalls, years ago, watching a Meg Ryan, Andy Garcia film, When A Man Loves A Woman, about an American sweetheart who turns into an alcoholic. "Alcohol is another vice an Indian woman can't own up to. We are going to break that taboo too in our film. It's a heartbreaking human story that gave me gooseflesh I had not felt in many years. I'm wildly excited because there's not enough representation of women of a certain age in our cinema today. Roles were more powerful 20-30 years ago. Today the female characters are asexual, dead, with no charm," she sighs. 

Pooja admits that while being a producer and a director gives you more control, acting liberates you. "And I am at that phase in my life when I want to let go now. So though I am terrified about going back and facing the camera because you can't take the medium for granted, for a story like this I'm prepared to get destroyed all over again. It's Daddy (her debut film) again, life's brought this opportunity, I'll open my arms wide and embrace it. Bring it on!" she exults.