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Facebook "Dislike" Button - Coming Soon!

People have asked whether Facebook would make a "Dislike" button for years, and for years Facebook has said that it wouldn't. It's kind of obvious why this cycle happens: there's a natural impulse to want to see a "Dislike" button next to Facebook's ubiquitous Like button, but there are also some real problems with that. Facebook doesn't want people using "Dislike" as a way to harass or disrespect other people, and — more cynically — you can argue that it certainly doesn't want people Disliking the sponsored posts that companies pay to put in your News Feed.

Facebook has apparently had a change of heart. It's making a Dislike button — or something like it — and it's apparently going to head into testing soon. "People have asked about the 'Dislike' button for many years ... and today is a special day, because today is the day that I actually get to say we are working on it and are very close to shipping a test of it," Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said today during a public Q&A session.

"What [users] really want is the ability to express empathy," said the 31-year-old CEO. "Not every moment is a good moment."

For the nearly 1.5 billion Facebook users who have been forced to "Like" everything up until now no matter how negative — funerals, a lost job, missing the cutoff for McDonald's breakfast — CEO Mark Zuckerberg is offering respite.

IT LIKELY WON'T BE CALLED THE "DISLIKE" BUTTON

In fact, Facebook's primary goal is to figure out how to let users "express empathy," Zuckerberg added, in situations in which liking a status, article, or photo is inappropriate. That means a "Dislike" button is likely off the table, as it's not complex enough for what Zuckerberg sounds like he wants it to do. And we all know how subtle Facebook really is. Many of the ways we communicate on the site, from the passive-aggressive like to the poke to the manipulative use of read receipts, can have hidden meanings. Those meanings change depending on which friend we're interacting with, giving Facebook users a series of social cues that go beyond words.

We decided to break down some of the more common sentiments we express with Facebook everyday without an explicit button for doing so. Which one should deserves its own button as the companion to "Like.

 

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